Overexpression of adhesion molecules and barrier molecules is associated with differential infiltration of immune cells in non-small cell lung cancer

Young Kwang Chae*, Wooyoung M. Choi, William H. Bae, Jonathan Anker, Andrew A. Davis, Sarita Agte, Wade T. Iams, Marcelo Cruz, Maria Matsangou, Francis J. Giles

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immunotherapy is emerging as a promising option for lung cancer treatment. Various endothelial adhesion molecules, such as integrin and selectin, as well as various cellular barrier molecules such as desmosome and tight junctions, regulate T-cell infiltration in the tumor microenvironment. However, little is known regarding how these molecules affect immune cells in patients with lung cancer. We demonstrated for the first time that overexpression of endothelial adhesion molecules and cellular barrier molecule genes was linked to differential infiltration of particular immune cells in non-small cell lung cancer. Overexpression of endothelial adhesion molecule genes is associated with significantly lower infiltration of activated CD4 and CD8 T-cells, but higher infiltration of activated B-cells and regulatory T-cells. In contrast, overexpression of desmosome genes was correlated with significantly higher infiltration of activated CD4 and CD8 T-cells, but lower infiltration of activated B-cells and regulatory T-cells in lung adenocarcinoma. This inverse relation of immune cells aligns with previous studies of tumor-infiltrating B-cells inhibiting T-cell activation. Although overexpression of endothelial adhesion molecule or cellular barrier molecule genes alone was not predictive of overall survival in our sample, these genetic signatures may serve as biomarkers of immune exclusion, or resistance to T-cell mediated immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1023
JournalScientific reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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