Parental Accommodation Predicts Symptom Severity at Long-Term Follow-Up in Children with Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: A Preliminary Investigation

Sarah K. Francazio*, Christopher A. Flessner, Christina Lynn Boisseau, Nicholas J. Sibrava, Maria C. Mancebo, Jane L. Eisen, Steven A. Rasmussen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pediatric obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic condition affecting millions of children. Though well intentioned, accommodation (i.e., a parent’s attempt to assuage their child’s distress and anxiety) is thought to increase OCD symptom severity and may cause greater OCD-related impairment. The present study sought to examine the relative contribution of parental accommodation in predicting OCD symptom severity. Children between the ages of 6 and 18 (and their parents) participated in a prospective, longitudinal study investigating the course of pediatric OCD utilizing a longitudinal design. Data was collected at intake (n = 30) and two-years (n = 22) post-intake controlling for age, anxiety and depression. Parental accommodation (measured at intake) significantly predicted OCD symptom severity and was the strongest predictor at both intake and two-year follow-up. These preliminary findings highlight the importance of further research seeking to delineate factors relevant to the development and maintenance of accommodation as well as parent-level variables that might mediate the relationship between accommodation and OCD symptom severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2562-2570
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Child
  • OCD symptom severity
  • Obsessive–compulsive disorder
  • Parental accommodation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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