Parental divorce in childhood and demographic outcomes in young adulthood

Andrew J. Cherlin*, Kathleen E. Kiernan, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

154 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the long-term effects of parental divorce in childhood on demographic outcomes in young adulthood, using a British longitudinal national survey of children. Our analyses control for predisruption characteristics of the child and the family, including emotional problems, cognitive' achievement, and socioeconomic status. The results show that by age 23, those whose parents divorced were more likely to leave home because of friction, to cohabit, and to have a child outside marriage than were those whose parents did not divorce. Young adults whose parents divorced, however, were no more or less likely to marry or to have a child in a marriage. Moreover, even in the divorced group, the great majority did not leave home because of friction or have a child outside marriage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-318
Number of pages20
JournalDemography
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

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