Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis: An American pediatric surgical association outcomes and clinical trials committee systematic review

Shawn J. Rangel, Casey M. Calkins, Robert A. Cowles, Douglas C. Barnhart, Eunice Y. Huang, Fizan Abdullah, Marjorie J. Arca, Daniel H. Teitelbaum*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to review evidence-based data addressing key clinical questions regarding parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) and parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in children. Data Source: Data were obtained from PubMed, Medicine databases of the English literature (up to October 2010), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Study Selection: The review of PNAC/PNALD has been divided into 4 areas to simplify one's understanding of the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease: (1) nonnutrient risk factors associated with PNAC, (2) PNAC and lipid emulsions, (3) nutritional (nonlipid) considerations in the prevention of PNAC, and (4) supplemental medications in the prevention and treatment of PNAC. Results: The data for each topic area relevant to the clinical practice of pediatric surgery were reviewed, evaluated, graded, and summarized. Conclusions: Although the conditions of PNAC and PNALD have been well recognized for more than 30 years, only a few concrete associations and treatment protocols have been established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-240
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • Lipid emulsion
  • Liver disease
  • Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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