Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization

Thomas Stoeger, Nico Battich, Lucas Pelkmans*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1151-1161
Number of pages11
JournalCell
Volume164
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology

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