Pathogenic and protective roles of B cells and antibodies in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nose and sinuses that affects up to 12% of the population in Europe and the United States. This complex disease is likely driven by multiple environmental, genetic, and inflammatory mechanisms, and recent studies suggest that B cells might play a critical role in disease pathogenesis. B cells and their antibodies have undisputed roles in health and disease within the airway mucosae. Deficient or inadequate B-cell responses can lead to susceptibility to infectious disease in the nose, whereas excess antibody production, including autoantibodies, can promote damaging inflammation. Thus, patients with B-cell defects often have either chronic or recurrent acute infections, and this can be associated with nonpolypoid CRS. In contrast, many patients with CRS with nasal polyps, which is less likely to be driven by pathogens, have excess production of local immunoglobulins, including autoreactive antibodies. These B-cell responses activate complement in many patients and likely contribute to immunopathogenic responses. A better understanding of the B cell–associated mechanisms that drive disease in patients with CRS should be a high priority in the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1553-1560
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume141
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

B-Lymphocytes
Antibodies
Nose
Nasal Polyps
Autoantibodies
Antibody Formation
Communicable Diseases
Immunoglobulins
Mucous Membrane
Chronic Disease
Inflammation
Health
Infection
Population

Keywords

  • Antibodies
  • B cells
  • antibody deficiency
  • autoimmunity
  • chronic rhinosinusitis
  • immunodeficiency
  • mucosal immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

@article{a76a895e935e4148beb8d2f1d78aba5a,
title = "Pathogenic and protective roles of B cells and antibodies in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis",
abstract = "Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nose and sinuses that affects up to 12{\%} of the population in Europe and the United States. This complex disease is likely driven by multiple environmental, genetic, and inflammatory mechanisms, and recent studies suggest that B cells might play a critical role in disease pathogenesis. B cells and their antibodies have undisputed roles in health and disease within the airway mucosae. Deficient or inadequate B-cell responses can lead to susceptibility to infectious disease in the nose, whereas excess antibody production, including autoantibodies, can promote damaging inflammation. Thus, patients with B-cell defects often have either chronic or recurrent acute infections, and this can be associated with nonpolypoid CRS. In contrast, many patients with CRS with nasal polyps, which is less likely to be driven by pathogens, have excess production of local immunoglobulins, including autoreactive antibodies. These B-cell responses activate complement in many patients and likely contribute to immunopathogenic responses. A better understanding of the B cell–associated mechanisms that drive disease in patients with CRS should be a high priority in the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease.",
keywords = "Antibodies, B cells, antibody deficiency, autoimmunity, chronic rhinosinusitis, immunodeficiency, mucosal immunity",
author = "Tan, {Bruce Kuang-Huay} and Peters, {Anju Tripathi} and Schleimer, {Robert P} and Hulse, {Kathryn E}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaci.2018.03.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "141",
pages = "1553--1560",
journal = "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0091-6749",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pathogenic and protective roles of B cells and antibodies in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

AU - Tan, Bruce Kuang-Huay

AU - Peters, Anju Tripathi

AU - Schleimer, Robert P

AU - Hulse, Kathryn E

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nose and sinuses that affects up to 12% of the population in Europe and the United States. This complex disease is likely driven by multiple environmental, genetic, and inflammatory mechanisms, and recent studies suggest that B cells might play a critical role in disease pathogenesis. B cells and their antibodies have undisputed roles in health and disease within the airway mucosae. Deficient or inadequate B-cell responses can lead to susceptibility to infectious disease in the nose, whereas excess antibody production, including autoantibodies, can promote damaging inflammation. Thus, patients with B-cell defects often have either chronic or recurrent acute infections, and this can be associated with nonpolypoid CRS. In contrast, many patients with CRS with nasal polyps, which is less likely to be driven by pathogens, have excess production of local immunoglobulins, including autoreactive antibodies. These B-cell responses activate complement in many patients and likely contribute to immunopathogenic responses. A better understanding of the B cell–associated mechanisms that drive disease in patients with CRS should be a high priority in the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease.

AB - Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nose and sinuses that affects up to 12% of the population in Europe and the United States. This complex disease is likely driven by multiple environmental, genetic, and inflammatory mechanisms, and recent studies suggest that B cells might play a critical role in disease pathogenesis. B cells and their antibodies have undisputed roles in health and disease within the airway mucosae. Deficient or inadequate B-cell responses can lead to susceptibility to infectious disease in the nose, whereas excess antibody production, including autoantibodies, can promote damaging inflammation. Thus, patients with B-cell defects often have either chronic or recurrent acute infections, and this can be associated with nonpolypoid CRS. In contrast, many patients with CRS with nasal polyps, which is less likely to be driven by pathogens, have excess production of local immunoglobulins, including autoreactive antibodies. These B-cell responses activate complement in many patients and likely contribute to immunopathogenic responses. A better understanding of the B cell–associated mechanisms that drive disease in patients with CRS should be a high priority in the quest to understand the pathogenesis of this disease.

KW - Antibodies

KW - B cells

KW - antibody deficiency

KW - autoimmunity

KW - chronic rhinosinusitis

KW - immunodeficiency

KW - mucosal immunity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046131694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046131694&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.03.002

M3 - Review article

VL - 141

SP - 1553

EP - 1560

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

IS - 5

ER -