Patient-centered surgical outcomes: The impact of goal achievement and urge incontinence on patient satisfaction one year after surgery

Sangeeta T. Mahajan*, Eman A. Elkadry, Kimberly S. Kenton, Susan Shott, Linda Brubaker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess factors that influence patient satisfaction 1 year after pelvic reconstructive surgery. Study design: We previously reported the objective success, goals, and expectations of a cohort of 78 patients 3 months after surgery. A second blinded independent physician investigator contacted the same patients by phone to reassess these items 1 year after surgery. Data were analyzed with the Spearman correlation, the Mann-Whitney test, the chi-squared test of association, and the Friedman test. Results: Seventy patients (89%) of the original cohort completed the second assessment. Although group satisfaction and goal achievement were stable (P < .01), 70% of patients reported a change in their satisfaction ratings between 3 months and 1 year (rho = 0.3). Reduced satisfaction between 3 and 12 months after surgery was strongly associated with decreased goal achievement (rho = 0.47; P = .006). Fifty-six percent of patients reported urge incontinence symptoms after surgery (44% de novo and 12% persistent). Urge incontinence was the most common reason for patient dissatisfaction after surgery (P = .04). Conclusion: Symptoms of urge incontinence and reduced achievement of subjective surgical goals are associated with decreased long-term patient satisfaction after reconstructive pelvic surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)722-728
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume194
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Keywords

  • Outcome
  • Outcomes research
  • Quality of life
  • Satisfaction
  • Surgical goal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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