Patient-reported Outcome Measures in Emergency Care Research: A Primer for Researchers, Peer Reviewers, and Readers

Howard S. Kim*, D. Mark Courtney, Danielle M. McCarthy, David Cella

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are of increasing importance in clinical research because they capture patients’ experience with well-being, illness, and their interactions with health care. Because PROs tend to focus on specific symptoms (e.g., pain, anxiety) or general assessments of patient functioning and quality of life that offer unique advantages compared to traditional clinical outcomes (e.g., mortality, emergency department revisits), emergency care researchers may benefit from incorporation of PRO measures into their research design as a primary or secondary outcome. Patients may also benefit from the ability of PROs to inform clinical practice and facilitate patient decision making, as PROs are obtained directly from the lived experience of other patients with similar conditions or health status. This review article introduces and defines key terminology relating to PROs, discusses reasons for utilizing PROs in clinical research, outlines basic psychometric and practical assessments that can be used to select a specific PRO measure, and highlights examples of commonly utilized PRO measures in emergency care research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-418
Number of pages16
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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