Patterns of care for carcinoma of the prostate gland: Results of a national survey of 1984 and 1990

G. W. Jones, C. Mettlin, G. P. Murphy, P. Guinan, H. W. Herr, D. H. Hussey, J. S. Chmiel, A. M. Fremgen*, R. E. Clive, K. E. Zuber-Ocwieja, D. P. Winchester

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The annual incidence of carcinoma of the prostate gland increased from an estimated 76,000 cases in 1984 to 200,000 in 1994. Part of this increase may be the result of increased detection. Management of the disease has also changed. To measure such changes, the American College of Surgeons conducted a patient care evaluation study of carcinoma of the prostate gland. STUDY DESIGN: Information was voluntarily submitted by cancer registrars on forms designed by a team of specialists. Data were received from 730 hospitals (of 2,000 hospitals invited for the study) on 14,716 patients with newly diagnosed adenocarcinomas of the prostate gland in 1984 and from 1,035 hospitals for 23,214 patients with carcinoma of the prostate gland in 1990. RESULTS: From 1984 to 1990, there was increased diagnostic use of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test (from 5.1 to 66.4 percent of incident carcinomas) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) (0.9 to 19.7 percent). Use of the prostatic acid phosphatase assay declined from 62.4 to 47 percent. Although the proportion of early stage (0, I, II) disease increased for all racial or ethnic groups combined, the greatest increase was for whites (from 57.3 to 60.6 percent), while the increase for African-Americans was less (from 46.9 to 48.3 percent). The use of radical prostatectomy without radiation therapy or chemotherapy increased from 7.3 to 20.3 percent and the proportion of patients receiving no carcinoma-directed treatment decreased from 37.8 to 30 percent. Radiation therapy remained the same. Hormone therapy without radical prostatectomy declined from 24.4 to 19.7 percent. African- Americans had a lower five-year survival rate than whites, even when stratified for stage. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnostic use of the PSA test and TRUS increased markedly by 1990 and may have contributed to the increased diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate gland and the earlier stage at diagnosis. The overall use of radical prostatectomy has increased and the proportion of patients receiving no treatment has decreased. African- Americans had a lower five-year survival rate than other groups, even when stage was controlled.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-554
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume180
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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