Patterns of care for women with cervical cancer in the United States

Edward L. Trimble, Linda C. Harlan, David Gius, Jennifer Stevens, Stephen M. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Recommendations for pretreatment evaluation and treatment of cervical cancer have significantly evolved over the last decade because of the results of multiple randomized studies comparing the addition of platin-based chemoradiation as well as the widespread dissemination and use of imaging modalities. This analysis was initiated to determine any systemic changes in management of cervical cancers. METHODS. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program data were used to sample newly diagnosed women in 1997, 2000, and 2001 with cancer of the cervix. A total of 3116 women with no previous diagnosis of cancer were selected. Data were reabstracted, additional information not routinely collected was obtained, therapy was verified with the treating physician, and multiple end-points were analyzed. RESULTS. A marked rise was observed in the percentage receiving chemotherapy (34% to 85%) as well as concurrent chemoradiation (20% to 72%) from 1997 to 2001. CONCLUSIONS. The significant change in the management and treatment of cervical cancer appears to correspond temporally with the publication of 5 clinical trials, all of which showed a significant improvement in overall survival associated with chemoradiation. This change also corresponded with the NCI Clinical Announcement that was disseminated in 1999 to those oncologists most likely to treat women with cervical cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-749
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume113
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2008

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Chemoradiation
  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiation
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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