Peanut allergy: Changes in dogma and past, present, and future directions

Sarah Mallay Boudreau-Romano, Nashmia Qamar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The prevalence of food allergy in the pediatric population, specifically to peanuts, has been rising. Accidental exposure to peanuts in a person who is allergic may have life-threatening consequences. Previous recommendations regarding peanut allergy included a delay in introduction of peanut to infants. However, more recent studies have provided sufficient contrary evidence supporting early introduction of peanuts for prevention of peanut allergy. Therefore, prompt evaluation by a specialist should be considered in infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy. Current treatment is strict avoidance of the allergen; however, future therapies are being sought, including oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and epicutaneous immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e300-e304
JournalPediatric Annals
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Fingerprint

Peanut Hypersensitivity
Immunotherapy
Sublingual Immunotherapy
Food Hypersensitivity
Allergens
Pediatrics
Direction compound
Arachis
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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Peanut allergy : Changes in dogma and past, present, and future directions. / Boudreau-Romano, Sarah Mallay; Qamar, Nashmia.

In: Pediatric Annals, Vol. 47, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. e300-e304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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