Pediatric Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room

Review of 87 cases

Michael Kinori*, Narasimhan Jagannathan, Anne M. Langguth, Marjorie A. Sasso, Marilyn B Mets, Bahram Rahmani, Hawke H Yoon, Mets-Halgrimson Rebecca Mets-Halgrimson, Sudhi P Kurup, Janice Lasky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIM: To report a large series of children having Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room using the lateral decubitus position. • METHODS: Medical records of children who underwent Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago between September 2008 and April 2017 were reviewed. Induction of general anesthesia and intubation was performed in the supine position after which the patient was placed in lateral decubitus position. The Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was performed using a standard protocol. At the completion of the procedure, the patient was turned back into the supine position and extubated. • RESULTS: This study included 87 eyes of 60 patients. Patient’s age ranged from 1 to 18y (mean 6.4±4.1y). In most cases (84/87, 97%), the procedure was performed under general anesthesia. In all cases, good focus on the membrane was achieved, and the procedure was performed successfully. There were no intraoperative ocular or anesthesia-related complications. • CONCLUSION: When performing Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room, the lateral decubitus position allows an easy and safe approach without the risk of potentially devastating complications that have been associated with the previously described sitting and prone positions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-783
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Solid-State Lasers
Operating Rooms
Pediatrics
Supine Position
General Anesthesia
Prone Position
Posture
Intubation
Medical Records
Anesthesia
Membranes

Keywords

  • General anesthesia
  • Pediatric cataract
  • Posterior capsular opacification
  • Yag capsulotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

@article{75ae6d15f45b4653ac9b47b875c33309,
title = "Pediatric Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room: Review of 87 cases",
abstract = "AIM: To report a large series of children having Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room using the lateral decubitus position. • METHODS: Medical records of children who underwent Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago between September 2008 and April 2017 were reviewed. Induction of general anesthesia and intubation was performed in the supine position after which the patient was placed in lateral decubitus position. The Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was performed using a standard protocol. At the completion of the procedure, the patient was turned back into the supine position and extubated. • RESULTS: This study included 87 eyes of 60 patients. Patient’s age ranged from 1 to 18y (mean 6.4±4.1y). In most cases (84/87, 97{\%}), the procedure was performed under general anesthesia. In all cases, good focus on the membrane was achieved, and the procedure was performed successfully. There were no intraoperative ocular or anesthesia-related complications. • CONCLUSION: When performing Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room, the lateral decubitus position allows an easy and safe approach without the risk of potentially devastating complications that have been associated with the previously described sitting and prone positions.",
keywords = "General anesthesia, Pediatric cataract, Posterior capsular opacification, Yag capsulotomy",
author = "Michael Kinori and Narasimhan Jagannathan and Langguth, {Anne M.} and Sasso, {Marjorie A.} and Mets, {Marilyn B} and Bahram Rahmani and Yoon, {Hawke H} and {Rebecca Mets-Halgrimson}, Mets-Halgrimson and Kurup, {Sudhi P} and Janice Lasky",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.18240/ijo.2019.05.12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "779--783",
journal = "International Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "2222-3959",
publisher = "Press of International Journal of Ophthalmology",
number = "5",

}

Pediatric Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room : Review of 87 cases. / Kinori, Michael; Jagannathan, Narasimhan; Langguth, Anne M.; Sasso, Marjorie A.; Mets, Marilyn B; Rahmani, Bahram; Yoon, Hawke H; Rebecca Mets-Halgrimson, Mets-Halgrimson; Kurup, Sudhi P; Lasky, Janice.

In: International Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.01.2019, p. 779-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room

T2 - Review of 87 cases

AU - Kinori, Michael

AU - Jagannathan, Narasimhan

AU - Langguth, Anne M.

AU - Sasso, Marjorie A.

AU - Mets, Marilyn B

AU - Rahmani, Bahram

AU - Yoon, Hawke H

AU - Rebecca Mets-Halgrimson, Mets-Halgrimson

AU - Kurup, Sudhi P

AU - Lasky, Janice

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - AIM: To report a large series of children having Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room using the lateral decubitus position. • METHODS: Medical records of children who underwent Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago between September 2008 and April 2017 were reviewed. Induction of general anesthesia and intubation was performed in the supine position after which the patient was placed in lateral decubitus position. The Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was performed using a standard protocol. At the completion of the procedure, the patient was turned back into the supine position and extubated. • RESULTS: This study included 87 eyes of 60 patients. Patient’s age ranged from 1 to 18y (mean 6.4±4.1y). In most cases (84/87, 97%), the procedure was performed under general anesthesia. In all cases, good focus on the membrane was achieved, and the procedure was performed successfully. There were no intraoperative ocular or anesthesia-related complications. • CONCLUSION: When performing Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room, the lateral decubitus position allows an easy and safe approach without the risk of potentially devastating complications that have been associated with the previously described sitting and prone positions.

AB - AIM: To report a large series of children having Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room using the lateral decubitus position. • METHODS: Medical records of children who underwent Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago between September 2008 and April 2017 were reviewed. Induction of general anesthesia and intubation was performed in the supine position after which the patient was placed in lateral decubitus position. The Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was performed using a standard protocol. At the completion of the procedure, the patient was turned back into the supine position and extubated. • RESULTS: This study included 87 eyes of 60 patients. Patient’s age ranged from 1 to 18y (mean 6.4±4.1y). In most cases (84/87, 97%), the procedure was performed under general anesthesia. In all cases, good focus on the membrane was achieved, and the procedure was performed successfully. There were no intraoperative ocular or anesthesia-related complications. • CONCLUSION: When performing Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in the operating room, the lateral decubitus position allows an easy and safe approach without the risk of potentially devastating complications that have been associated with the previously described sitting and prone positions.

KW - General anesthesia

KW - Pediatric cataract

KW - Posterior capsular opacification

KW - Yag capsulotomy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066957879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066957879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.18240/ijo.2019.05.12

DO - 10.18240/ijo.2019.05.12

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 779

EP - 783

JO - International Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - International Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 2222-3959

IS - 5

ER -