Pediatric renal cell carcinoma

Elizabeth J Perlman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Renal cell carcinomas are rare in children, and they show significant differences in their histology and pathogenesis when compared with those common in adults. The most common subtypes seen preferentially in children are the translocation-associated tumors, papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and oncocytic renal cell carcinoma following neuroblastoma. The histologic diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is made difficult by the considerable heterogeneity within and overlap between each of the above subtypes and by similarities to other pediatric renal neoplasms. While no effective therapies have yet been identified, there is considerable promise that the new Children's Oncology Group protocol will provide knowledge that will guide the future therapy of these lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-651
Number of pages11
JournalSurgical Pathology Clinics
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

Renal Cell Carcinoma
Pediatrics
Medullary Carcinoma
Kidney Neoplasms
Neuroblastoma
Histology
Kidney
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Carcinoma
  • Children
  • Pediatric
  • Renal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Pediatric renal cell carcinoma",
abstract = "Renal cell carcinomas are rare in children, and they show significant differences in their histology and pathogenesis when compared with those common in adults. The most common subtypes seen preferentially in children are the translocation-associated tumors, papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and oncocytic renal cell carcinoma following neuroblastoma. The histologic diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is made difficult by the considerable heterogeneity within and overlap between each of the above subtypes and by similarities to other pediatric renal neoplasms. While no effective therapies have yet been identified, there is considerable promise that the new Children's Oncology Group protocol will provide knowledge that will guide the future therapy of these lesions.",
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Pediatric renal cell carcinoma. / Perlman, Elizabeth J.

In: Surgical Pathology Clinics, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 641-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric renal cell carcinoma

AU - Perlman, Elizabeth J

PY - 2010/9/1

Y1 - 2010/9/1

N2 - Renal cell carcinomas are rare in children, and they show significant differences in their histology and pathogenesis when compared with those common in adults. The most common subtypes seen preferentially in children are the translocation-associated tumors, papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and oncocytic renal cell carcinoma following neuroblastoma. The histologic diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is made difficult by the considerable heterogeneity within and overlap between each of the above subtypes and by similarities to other pediatric renal neoplasms. While no effective therapies have yet been identified, there is considerable promise that the new Children's Oncology Group protocol will provide knowledge that will guide the future therapy of these lesions.

AB - Renal cell carcinomas are rare in children, and they show significant differences in their histology and pathogenesis when compared with those common in adults. The most common subtypes seen preferentially in children are the translocation-associated tumors, papillary renal cell carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and oncocytic renal cell carcinoma following neuroblastoma. The histologic diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is made difficult by the considerable heterogeneity within and overlap between each of the above subtypes and by similarities to other pediatric renal neoplasms. While no effective therapies have yet been identified, there is considerable promise that the new Children's Oncology Group protocol will provide knowledge that will guide the future therapy of these lesions.

KW - Carcinoma

KW - Children

KW - Pediatric

KW - Renal

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U2 - 10.1016/j.path.2010.06.011

DO - 10.1016/j.path.2010.06.011

M3 - Review article

VL - 3

SP - 641

EP - 651

JO - Surgical Pathology Clinics

JF - Surgical Pathology Clinics

SN - 1875-9181

IS - 3

ER -