Pediatrician characteristics associated with child abuse identification and reporting: Results from a national survey of pediatricians

Emalee G. Flaherty*, Robert Sege, Lori Lyn Price, Katherine Kaufer Christoffel, David P. Norton, Karen G. O'Connor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pediatrician experience with child protective services (CPS) and factors associated with identifying and reporting suspected child physical abuse were examined by a survey of members of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Respondents provided information, about their demographics and experience, attitudes and practices with child abuse. They indicated their diagnosis and management of a child in a purposely ambiguous clinical vignette. Pediatricians who had received recent child abuse education were more confident in their ability to identify and manage child abuse. High confidence in ability to manage child abuse and positive attitude about domestic violence screening and value of anticipatory guidance predicted that pediatricians would have high suspicion that the child in the vignette was abused and that they would report the child to CPS. Future efforts to improve medical intervention in child abuse should focus on physician attitudes and experience, as well as cognitive factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-369
Number of pages9
JournalChild Maltreatment
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Decision making
  • Physician

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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