Perceived stress mediates the effects of coping on the quality of life of HIV-positive women on highly active antiretroviral therapy

Kathryn E. Weaver, Michael H. Antoni, Suzanne C. Lechner, Ron E F Durán, Frank Penedo, M. Isabel Fernandez, Gail Ironson, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between three HIV-specific coping strategies (cognitive coping strategies, denial, and religious coping) and quality of life (QoL) in 90 HIV+, predominately minority women on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Religious coping was unrelated to QoL however, use of cognitive coping strategies was related to greater QoL, and denial was related to poorer QoL. Baron and Kenny's model of mediation was then used to test perceived stress as a mediator of the relationships between denial and cognitive coping strategies and QoL. These relationships were both mediated by perceived stress. Results suggest that utilization of certain coping strategies may lessen or heighten perceptions of life stressfulness, thereby influencing QoL in this understudied population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS women
  • coping
  • perceived stress
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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