Percutaneous closure of perivalvular mitral regurgitation: How should the interventionalists and the echocardiographers communicate?

Nishath Quader, Charles J. Davidson, Vera H. Rigolin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is considerable interest in percutaneous closure of perivalvular leaks without the need for repeat surgery. Successful percutaneous closure of these defects requires extensive planning and coordination before and during the procedure. However, there is no standardized description of valve pathology in the presence of a prosthetic valve, which adds to the challenge of communication. Transesophageal echocardiography is ideally suited to guide percutaneous mitral valve procedures, because of the proximity of the mitral valve to the esophagus. Successful percutaneous procedures of the mitral valve require teamwork. Both the interventionalist and the echocardiographer must have great familiarity with mitral valve anatomy, structure, and function, and they must know how to effectively communicate with each other. The authors review the relevant periprocedural mapping of the mitral valve and provide guidance to echocardiographers and interventionalists on effective ways to communicate during percutaneous perivalvular mitral leak closures to accomplish a successful outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-508
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Keywords

  • 3D echocardiography
  • Communication
  • Percutaneous closure
  • Perivalvular regurgitation
  • Prosthetic mitral valve
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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