Perioperative resting pressure predicts long-term postoperative function after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

Amy L. Halverson, Tracy L. Hull*, Feza Remzi, Jeffery P. Hammel, Tom Schroeder, Victor W. Fazio, B. A. Orkin, Keith A. Kelly

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether perioperative manometry is useful in predicting long-term functional status after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). Prospectively collected perioperative anal manometry data from 1439 patients undergoing IPAA from 1986 to 2000 were compared to postoperative functional status at various time intervals from 6 months to 8 years after IPAA. A validated questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding restrictions of diet, work, social and sexual activity, urgency, fecal seepage or incontinence, energy level, satisfaction with surgery, and quality of life. The presence of seepage and the degree of incontinence were compared to the patient's perceived quality of life, health, energy level, and satisfaction with surgery. Low (<40 mm Hg) pre- and postoperative resting pressures were associated with increased seepage, pad use, and incontinence. Patients with low resting pressures also reported diminished quality of life, health, energy level, and satisfaction with surgery. There was a significant association (P < 0.001) between seepage and degree of incontinence and quality of health, quality of life, energy level, and level of satisfaction with surgery. Perioperative resting anal sphincter pressures greater than 40 mm Hg are associated with significantly better function and quality of life after ileal IPAA. Improved functional outcome is associated with better quality-of-life outcomes. Low preoperative resting pressures do not preclude successful outcome after IPAA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-321
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Colonic Pouches
Quality of Life
Pressure
Manometry
Health Status
Incontinence Pads
Anal Canal
Sexual Behavior
Diet
Health

Keywords

  • Anastomosis
  • Function
  • Ileal pouch
  • Incontinence
  • Manometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Halverson, Amy L. ; Hull, Tracy L. ; Remzi, Feza ; Hammel, Jeffery P. ; Schroeder, Tom ; Fazio, Victor W. ; Orkin, B. A. ; Kelly, Keith A. / Perioperative resting pressure predicts long-term postoperative function after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 316-321.
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Perioperative resting pressure predicts long-term postoperative function after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. / Halverson, Amy L.; Hull, Tracy L.; Remzi, Feza; Hammel, Jeffery P.; Schroeder, Tom; Fazio, Victor W.; Orkin, B. A.; Kelly, Keith A.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 316-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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