Perioperative steroids for peritumoral intracranial edema: A review of mechanisms, efficacy, and side effects

John Farouk Bebawy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

There has been a renewed interest in the recent literature regarding the proposed benefits of systemic steroids in the perioperative period. Among these benefits are the relief of postoperative pain, the decrease in postoperative nausea, and a higher overall multiparameter quality of recovery. Perioperative steroids, however, are not without their potential drawbacks, including decreased immune function, hyperglycemia, and impaired wound healing. The use of perioperative steroids for brain tumor treatment and resection has been a component of therapy for approximately 50 years, owing primarily to their well-described, although poorly understood, effect in minimizing vasogenic peritumoral edema, and therefore intracranial pressure. This review seeks to highlight the history, mechanisms, therapeutic efficacy, and side effects of steroid use for brain tumors in the perioperative period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-177
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Keywords

  • brain edema
  • brain tumor
  • glucocorticoids
  • perioperative steroids
  • peritumoral edema
  • steroid side effects
  • steroids
  • vasogenic edema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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