Persistent Food Insecurity, but not HIV, is Associated with Depressive Symptoms Among Perinatal Women in Kenya: A Longitudinal Perspective

Emily L. Tuthill, Ann Maltby, Jalang Conteh, Lila A. Sheira, Joshua D. Miller, Maricianah Onono, Sheri D. Weiser, Sera L. Young*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Food insecurity (FI) is an understudied risk factor for depression among perinatal women in sub-Saharan Africa. We therefore explored the longitudinal relationship between FI and depressive symptoms among a cohort of perinatal women of mixed HIV status (n = 371) in Kenya (NCT02974972, NCT02979418). Using longitudinal linear and logistic regressions with random effects, we assessed bivariate and adjusted associations between maternal FI and depressive symptoms. HIV status was also assessed as a potential effect modifier. At baseline, 58% of pregnant women had probable depression (CES-D score > 16) and 84% were severely food insecure. In adjusted analyses, severely food-insecure women had 5.90 greater odds (95% CI 2.32, 15.02, p < 0.001) of having probable depression and scored 4.58 points higher on the CES-D scale (SE: 1.04, p < 0.001) relative to food-secure women. HIV status did not modify the association between FI and depressive symptoms. Interventions to reduce FI may reduce perinatal depression, benefiting mothers and their infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Food security
  • HIV
  • Kenya
  • Postnatal depression
  • Prenatal depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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