Persuasive impact of loss and gain frames on intentions to exercise. test of six moderators

Jakob D. Jensen*, Chelsea L. Ratcliff, Robert N. Yale, Melinda Krakow, Courtney L. Scherr, Sara K. Yeo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study situated loss/gain-framing research in the extended parallel process model and tested whether two message features (dose, efficacy appeals) and four individual difference variables (walking self-efficacy, grit, consideration of future consequences, health information overload (HIO)) moderated the impact of message framing on intentions to engage in physical activity. Adults (. 341, Mage. 38.09, S. 10.94) were randomly assigned to one of eight message conditions advocating exercise behavior. All four individual difference variables significantly moderated framing effects such that gain-framed messages were more effective for individuals with lower walking self-efficacy, grit, and consideration of future consequences and loss-framed messages were significantly more effective for individuals with higher walking self-efficacy, grit, consideration of future consequences, and for those with lower HIO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-262
Number of pages18
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

Keywords

  • Loss frame
  • consideration of future consequences
  • dose
  • efficacy
  • exercise
  • extended parallel process model
  • gain frame
  • grit
  • health information overload
  • moderators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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