Phase transformation in fatigue fracture of lead free solder interconnects

Yao Yao*, Brent A. Fiedler, Leon M Keer, Morris E. Fine

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Lead free solders are replacing lead rich solders in the electronic industry. In the present study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of Sn-Ag-Cu solder interconnect has been investigated. Fatigue experiments were carried out on plastic ball grid array (PBGA) solder interconnects, different fatigue crack growth phases in interconnects were observed in the experiments. Displacement controlled shear fatigue was done with a simple strain range from 0.01 to 0.1 (0.005 μm to 0.050 μm displacement) and cycle frequency of 0.1 Hz. It is found in the experiment that the majority of the interconnect lifetime is contained at the crack nucleation and early crack growth stage. Different phases of fatigue crack propagation are observed in the experiments, the crack propagates slower in solder and faster in IMC layer or solder/IMC interface. The fatigue crack propagation rate was predicted using phase transformation theory. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental results was obtained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaterials Science and Technology Conference and Exhibition 2010, MS and T'10
Pages614-622
Number of pages9
Volume1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
EventMaterials Science and Technology Conference and Exhibition 2010, MS and T'10 - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 17 2010Oct 21 2010

Other

OtherMaterials Science and Technology Conference and Exhibition 2010, MS and T'10
CountryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period10/17/1010/21/10

Keywords

  • Crack propagation
  • Fatigue
  • Intermetallic
  • Phase transformation
  • Solder interconnects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)

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