Phenomenological programming: A novel approach to designing domain specific programming environments for science learning

Umit Asian, Nicholas Lagrassa, Michael Horn, Uri Wilensky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

There has been a growing interest in the use of computer-based models of scientific phenomena as part of classroom curricula, especially models that learners create for themselves. However, while studies show that constructing computational models of phenomena can serve as a powerful foundation for learning science, this approach has struggled to gain widespread adoption in classrooms because it not only requires teachers to learn sophisticated technological tools (such as computer programming), but it also requires precious instructional time to introduce these tools to students. Moreover, many core scientific topics such as the kinetic molecular theory, natural selection, and electricity are difficult to model even with novice-friendly environments. To address these limitations, we present a novel design approach called phenomenological programming that builds on students' intuitive understanding of real-world objects, patterns, and events to support the construction of agent-based computational models. We present preliminary case studies and discuss their implications for STEM content learning and the learnability and expressive power of phenomenological programming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference, IDC 2020
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages299-310
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781450379816
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 21 2020
Event2020 Interaction Design and Children Conference, IDC 2020 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 21 2020Jun 24 2020

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference, IDC 2020

Conference

Conference2020 Interaction Design and Children Conference, IDC 2020
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period6/21/206/24/20

Keywords

  • agent-based modeling
  • chemistry education
  • computational thinking
  • constructionism
  • novice-friendly programming environments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Phenomenological programming: A novel approach to designing domain specific programming environments for science learning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this