Photodynamic therapy of choroidal hemangioma in sturge-weber syndrome, with a review of treatments for diffuse and circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas

Michael S. Tsipursky*, Pamela R. Golchet, Lee M. Jampol

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report three new cases of patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome and symptomatic retinal detachments from diffuse choroidal hemangiomas successfully treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) and review medical literature on the available treatment options for choroidal hemangiomas. All patients were treated with a single session of PDT with verteporfin infused at a concentration of 6 mg/m2 and treated for 83 seconds with 689-nm Zeiss laser that was delivered with total energy level of 50 J/cm2 with an intensity of 600 mW/cm2. The exudative retinal detachment (RD) and macular edema completely resolved in all cases by 1-4 months after PDT treatment. Visual acuity improved in all three cases with diminished tumor size in the areas of treatment. One case was followed for 5 months, another for 2 years, and the third case for 6 years, with no recurrence of exudative RD. PDT is an effective treatment option for visual deterioration from exudative retinal detachment in patients with diffuse choroidal hemangiomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-85
Number of pages18
JournalSurvey of ophthalmology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Circumscribed and diffuse choroidal hemangioma
  • Cystoid macular edema
  • Laser photocoagulation
  • PDT
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Preretinal fibrosis
  • Proton beam radiotherapy
  • Radiation therapy
  • Stereotactic radiotherapy
  • Transpupillary thermotherapy
  • Verteporfin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Photodynamic therapy of choroidal hemangioma in sturge-weber syndrome, with a review of treatments for diffuse and circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this