Phylogenetic analysis of T-box genes demorostrates the importance of amphioxus for understanding evolution of the vertebrate genome

I. Ruvinsky, L. M. Silver, J. J. Gibson-Brown*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

The duplication of preexisting genes has played a major role in evolution. To understand the evolution of genetic complexity it is important to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of the genome. A widely held view suggests that the vertebrate genome evolved via two successive rounds of whole-genome duplication. To test this model we have isolated seven new T-box genes from the primitive chordate amphioxus. We find that each amphioxus gene generally corresponds to two or three vertebrate counterparts. A phylogenetic analysis of these genes supports the idea that a single whole-genome duplication took place early in vertebrate evolution, but cannot exclude the possibility that a second duplication later took place. The origin of additional paralogs evident in this and other gene families could be the result of subsequent, smaller-scale chromosomal duplications. Our findings highlight the importance of amphioxus as a key organism for understanding evolution of the vertebrate genome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1249-1257
Number of pages9
JournalGenetics
Volume156
Issue number3
StatePublished - Nov 20 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Phylogenetic analysis of T-box genes demorostrates the importance of amphioxus for understanding evolution of the vertebrate genome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this