Physical Activity Levels in U.S. Latino/Hispanic Adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Elva M. Arredondo*, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Mark Stoutenberg, Sonia M. Davis, Noe C. Crespo, Mercedes R. Carnethon, Sheila F. Castañeda, Carmen R. Isasi, Rebeca A. Espinoza, Martha L. Daviglus, Lilian G. Perez, Kelly R. Evenson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Physical activity (PA) prevalence among U.S. Latino/Hispanic adults of diverse backgrounds is not well known. This study describes PA among a representative sample of U.S. Latino/Hispanic adults. Methods A population-based cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (aged 18-74 years) participating in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos from March 2008 to June 2011 (N=16,415) was recruited in four urban areas from Miami, the Bronx, Chicago, and San Diego. Participants wore an Actical hip accelerometer for 1 week (n=12,253) and completed the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (n=15,741). Data were analyzed in 2015. Results Based on accelerometry, Hispanics/Latinos engaged in 23.8 minutes/day (10.3 minutes/day when only considering minutes from sustained 10-minute bouts) of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA). Individuals of Puerto Rican and Dominican background had the most minutes/day of MVPA (32.1 and 29.1, respectively), whereas those of Cuban background had the fewest (15.3). Based on the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, 65% of Hispanic/Latinos met the aerobic component of 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Men and individuals of Puerto Rican background had the most minutes/day of leisure-time MVPA (30.3 and 30.2, respectively). Individuals of Puerto Rican and Dominican background had the most minutes/day of transportation-related PA (48.7 and 39.7, respectively). Individuals of Mexican and Central American background had the most minutes/day of work-related MVPA (90.7 and 93.2, respectively). Conclusions Among Hispanics/Latinos, self-reported data provided information on the type of PA and helped explain variability identified from accelerometer-assessed PA. These findings highlight variability in PA among Hispanics from diverse ethnic backgrounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-508
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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