Physician risk perceptions and surveillance practices for tyrosine kinase inhibitor long-term effects in pediatric CML

Stephanie M. Smith*, Shiqi Zhang, Vandana Sundaram, Michael Roth, Jeffrey R. Andolina, Lidia Schapira, Kathleen M. Sakamoto, E. Anders Kolb, Nobuko Hijiya, Sonali Chaudhury

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is effectively treated with long-term tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy, yet little is known about risks of prolonged TKI exposure in young patients, and long-term effect monitoring is not standardized. We surveyed North American pediatric oncologists (n = 119) to evaluate perceived risk of and surveillance practices for potential toxicities associated with prolonged TKI exposure in children and adolescents/young adults (AYAs) with CML. Survey domains included general and specific risk perceptions and surveillance practices for asymptomatic patients on chronic TKI therapy. We analyzed data descriptively and explored relationships between risk perceptions and surveillance. Risk perceptions varied among oncologists but were similar across six categories (thyroid, cardiac, vascular, metabolic, fertility, psychologic), with less than one-third rating each risk as moderate or high in pediatric and AYA patients. More oncologists perceived moderate or high risk of growth abnormalities in children (62% pediatric, 14% AYA) and financial toxicity in all patients (60% pediatric, 64% AYA). A greater proportion of oncologists with moderate or high perceived risk of thyroid abnormalities reported testing thyroid function compared to those with lower perceived risk; patterns for metabolic risk/lipid tests and cardiac risk/tests were similar. In summary, we found that pediatric oncologists had variable risk perceptions and surveillance practices for potential toxicities associated with prolonged TKI exposure. Standardizing surveillance would help quantify risks and refine recommendations. Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/08880018.2021.2017085.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Hematology and Oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • BCR-ABL
  • chronic myeloid leukemia
  • late effects
  • long-term effects
  • tyrosine kinase inhibitors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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