Physics for infants

Characterizing the origins of knowledge about objects, substances, and number

Susan J Hespos*, Kristy van Marle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adults possess a great deal of knowledge about how objects behave and interact in our every day environment, yet several puzzles remain unsolved regarding how we manage this ubiquitous skill. The notion of intuitive physics has been a central focus of research on cognitive development in infancy. This article focuses on the origins of knowledge about objects, substances, and number concepts in infancy. The article reviews common themes of solidity, continuity, cohesion, and property changes as they have been studied with regard to infants' knowledge about objects and more recently with regard to infants' knowledge about substances. In addition, we review how object and substance knowledge interfaces with number knowledge systems. The evidence supports the view that certain core principles about these domains are present as early as we can test for them and the nature of the underlying representation is best characterized as primitive initial concepts that are elaborated and refined through learning and experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Physics for infants : Characterizing the origins of knowledge about objects, substances, and number. / Hespos, Susan J; van Marle, Kristy.

In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 19-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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