Planning and Executing the Neurosurgery Boot Camp: The Bolivia Experience

Jared D. Ament*, Timothy Kim, Judah Gold-Markel, Isabelle M. Germano, Robert Dempsey, John P. Weaver, Arthur J. DiPatri, Russell J. Andrews, Mary Sanchez, Juan Hinojosa, Richard P. Moser, Roberta Glick

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The neurosurgical boot camp has been fully incorporated into U.S. postgraduate education. This is the first implementation of the neurosurgical boot in a developing country. To advance neurosurgical education, we developed a similar boot camp program, in collaboration with Bolivian neurosurgeons, to determine its feasibility and effectiveness in an international setting. Methods In a collective effort, the Bolivian Society for Neurosurgery, Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery, Solidarity Bridge, and University of Massachusetts organized and executed the first South American neurosurgical boot camp in Bolivia in 2015. Both U.S. and Bolivian faculty led didactic lectures followed by a practicum day using mannequins and simulators. South American residents and faculty were surveyed after the course to determine levels of enthusiasm and their perceived improvement in fund of knowledge and course effectiveness. Results Twenty-four neurosurgery residents from 5 South American countries participated. Average survey scores ranged between 4.2 and 4.9 out of 5. Five Bolivian neurosurgeons completed the survey with average scores of 4.5–5. This event allowed for Bolivian leaders in the field to unify around education, resulting in the formation of an institute to continue similar initiatives. Total cost was estimated at $40 000 USD; however, significant faculty, industry, and donor support helped offset this amount. Conclusion The first South American neurosurgical boot camp had significant value and was well received in Bolivia. This humanitarian model provides a sustainable solution to education needs and should be expanded to other regions as a means for standardizing the core competencies in neurosurgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-410
Number of pages4
JournalWorld neurosurgery
Volume104
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Keywords

  • ACGME core competencies
  • Boot camp
  • International neurosurgery education
  • Neurosurgical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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