Plasticity of arterial vasculature during simulated weightlessness and its possible role in the genesis of postflight orthostatic intolerance.

L. F. Zhang*, J. Ma, Q. W. Mao, Z. B. Yu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Even after several decades of extensive research, the basic mechanism of postflight cardiovascular dysfunction has not yet been fully elucidated. It is now well recognized that multiple mechanisms might account for the frequent occurrence of significant postflight orthostatic intolerance. It has been found that all tissues adapt their design when exposed to sustained alteration in local activity and/or stress. The most obvious example is the musculo-skeletal system, structure and function of which might be severely affected during microgravity exposure. In an attempt to elucidate whether structure and function of cardiac and vascular smooth muscle might be affected by simulated by microgravity, a serial work was started several years ago. In this paper, we present our more recent findings on plasticity of arterial vasculature and its innervation state during and after simulated microgravity and its time course.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)P97-100
JournalJournal of gravitational physiology : a journal of the International Society for Gravitational Physiology
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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