Platinum bronzes. III. A reinvestigation of the composition of Adams' catalyst (1)

David Cahen*, James A Ibers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The platinum oxide, commonly known as Adams' catalyst and formulated as PtO2 · H2O, has been found to be a mixture of Pt, α-PtO2 (possibly hydrated) and NaxPt3O4, sodium platinum bronze. Both α-PtO2 and NaxPt3O4 are active as hydrogenating agents for cyclopentene and benzene, but α-PtO2 is converted completely to Pt metal, while only minor decomposition to the metal occurs for NaxPt3O4. It is suggested that the irreproducibility of the activity of Adams' oxide might be caused by a variation of the relative amounts of Pt metal and the oxides in the mixture. Methods for preparing a more consistent catalyst are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-371
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Catalysis
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1973

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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