Playing with representations: How do kids make use of quantitative representations in video games?

Tom Satwicz*, Reed Stevens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes the use of quantities in video games by young people as part of a broader effort to understand thinking and learning across naturally occurring contexts of activity. Our approach to investigating the use of quantities in game play is ethnographic; we have followed eight children over a six-month period as they play their own games at home. The data set is composed of video recordings and artifact-based interviews. The concept of disciplined perception is used to understand how quantities are coordinated during game play. The current study shows young people using quantities in games to make predictions and organize their actions based on those predictions. Some ideas based on the study's findings for using video games in school are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-206
Number of pages28
JournalInternational Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Keywords

  • Disciplined perception
  • Distributed cognition
  • Ethnography
  • Everyday mathematics
  • Learning
  • Representations
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Engineering(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

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