Postoperative management and restrictions for female pelvic surgery: A systematic review

Miles Murphy*, Cedric Olivera, Thomas Wheeler, Elizabeth Casiano, Nazema Siddiqui, Rajiv Gala, Tondalaya Gamble, Ethan M. Balk, Vivian W. Sung

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: We sought to systematically review the literature regarding the effect of postoperative restrictions on clinical outcomes after pelvic surgery. Methods: English-language articles were identified by a MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials search from inception to July 2010. We used key words describing various gynecologic surgical procedures and postoperative activities, including mobility, lifting, work, coitus, and exercise. Randomized and nonrandomized studies comparing interventions with outcomes of interest were included. Results: The literature search yielded of 3,491 articles; 115 full-text articles were reviewed, and 38 met eligibility criteria and are reported and analyzed here. Our analysis revealed that expedited discharge protocols and early postoperative feeding and catheter removal result in shorter hospital stay without negative health outcomes. However, there are limited data to guide many other aspects of postoperative care, particularly regarding exercise and resumption of sexual activity after surgery. Conclusions: There is good evidence to support early postoperative feeding and catheter removal after pelvic surgery. There are limited data to guide many other aspects of postoperative care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-193
Number of pages9
JournalInternational urogynecology journal and pelvic floor dysfunction
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

Keywords

  • Management
  • Postoperative
  • Restrictions
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

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