Potential effect of the administration of substance P and allergen therapy on immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reactions in human subjects

Roy Patterson*, Kathleen E. Harris, Leslie C. Grammer, Paul A. Greenberger, Anne M. Ditto, Martha A. Shaughnessy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previously we observed and reported that immunoglobulin E-mediated (IgE-mediated) allergy in rhesus monkeys was decreased by the administration of substance P (SP) and an allergen. We extended these studies to human subjects, giving SP and 1 allergen to subjects with reactivity to more than 1 allergen, using reactivity to a second allergen as a control. SP and an allergen were initially given by aerosol delivery but subsequently were given by injection. The administration of SP and 1 allergen by aerosol delivery or injection resulted in decreased IgE-mediated reactivity to the allergen administered and also to the control allergen. This result occurred in 7 of 8 human subjects. The 2 initial subjects receiving 8 SP and allergen injections had a sharp reduction in their symptoms of ragweed hay fever lasting for 3 years to date. No significant reactions to the injection of SP occurred. Further controlled human research is necessary on the administration of SP and allergen and the mechanisms of action. Unexpected and serendipitous results first observed in rhesus monkeys and reproduced in allergic human subjects provide a new and potential mechanism for control and perhaps obliteration of common IgE-mediated allergies and even more-serious allergic problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-199
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume133
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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