Potential quantitative magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of coronary remodeling in older hypertensive patients.

Kai Lin*, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Ying Liu, Xiaoming Bi, Debiao Li, James C. Carr

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

To detect differences in potential magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of coronary remodeling between older hypertensive patients and healthy controls. Two-dimensional black-blood coronary wall magnetic resonance imaging and 3-dimensional whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography were performed on 130 participants (65-84 years), including 65 hypertensive patients and 65 healthy controls. Coronary segments derived from hypertensive participants had a higher mean coronary wall thickness, a smaller vessel area, a smaller coronary wall area, a smaller lumen area, a lower coronary distensibility index, and a higher percent of the coronary wall occupying the vessel area (PWOV) than those from healthy controls. When the average PWOV was set as an ad hoc cutoff point, coronary segments with a high PWOV had a significantly higher mean wall thickness, a higher maximum wall thickness, a smaller vessel area, a smaller lumen area, a lower coronary distensibility index, and a higher coronary plaque index compared with coronary segments with a low PWOV. Magnetic resonance techniques are able to noninvasively detect significant differences in potential imaging biomarkers of coronary remodeling between older hypertensive patients and healthy controls. The PWOV is a promising remodeling feature for quantitatively evaluating the progression of coronary atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1742-1747
Number of pages6
JournalArteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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