Practice and policy of measuring quality of life and health economics in cancer clinical trials: A survey among co-operative trial groups

G. Kiebert*, S. Wait, J. Bernhard, A. Bezjak, D. Cella, R. Day, J. Houghton, C. Moinpour, C. Scott, R. Stephens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Co-operative groups have played an important role in the advance of health-related quality of life (HRQL) research. However, definitions of the concept, criteria for selection of existing instruments and methods for data collection and interpretation remain poorly defined in the literature. A survey was conducted amongst the major cancer co-operative groups in order to gain a better understanding of their current policy and processes to ensure optimal HRQL data collection within cancer clinical trials. The topic of health economics was similarly addressed. Methods: A written questionnaire was addressed to 16 major European and North American cancer co-operative groups. Eleven groups responded (response rate: 69%), however, one group could not provide information for the survey, thus ten questionnaires were available for analysis. Results: The results from this survey among co-operative groups show that HRQL (more than health economics) is recognized as an important, although usually secondary, outcome measure in oncology trials. On the whole, co-operative groups have a rather flexible policy towards the inclusion of HRQL (and HE) into their clinical trials, and practice is very much on a case-by-case basis, but use standard practice guidelines and internal procedures is to ensure well-defined study protocols and enhance good quality studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1073-1080
Number of pages8
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Co-operative group
  • Health economics
  • Quality of life
  • Randomized controlled clinical trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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