Practice parameter: Utility of electrodiagnostic techniques in evaluating patients with suspected peroneal neuropathy: An evidence-based review

Christina Marciniak*, Carmel Armon, John Wilson, Robert Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

An evidence-based review of electrodiagnostic (EDX) techniques in the evaluation of peroneal neuropathy was conducted to determine whether these techniques are useful for diagnosis and prognostication in this disorder. A Medline search and a review of relevant sources were performed in 1999 and updated through July 2003 to identify articles describing the use of EDX in patients suspected to have peroneal neuropathy. From the 499 articles identified, 112 articles describing motor and sensory nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography in peroneal neuropathy were reviewed in detail; 11 articles met the predetermined literature inclusion criteria for the adequacy of EDX techniques employed. Six articles provided Class III evidence in support of a role for nerve conduction studies in making the diagnosis of peroneal neuropathy; five articles provided Class IV evidence. Implicit in making the diagnosis were normal EDX findings outside the distribution of the peroneal nerve. The current literature supports the use of EDX in patients with suspected peroneal neuropathy (Level C recommendation.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-527
Number of pages8
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Keywords

  • Compression neuropathies
  • Deep peroneal neuropathy
  • Electrodiagnostic
  • Entrapment neuropathies
  • Foot drop
  • Mononeuritis
  • Peroneal neuropathy
  • Superficial peroneal neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

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