Practice parameters for the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

M. Dulcan*, J. E. Dunne, W. Ayres, V. Arnold, R. S. Benson, W. Bernet, O. Bukstein, J. Kinlan, H. Leonard, W. Licamele, J. McClellan, L. E. Sloan, C. M. Miles

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

548 Scopus citations

Abstract

These practice parameters review the literature on children, adolescents, and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There are three types of ADHD: predominantly inattentive, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive, and combined. Together, they occur in as many as 10% of boys and 5% of girls of elementary school age. Prevalence declines with age, although up to 65% of hyperactive children are still symptomatic as adults. Frequency in adults is estimated to be 2% to 7%. Assessment includes clinical interviews and standardized rating scales from parents and teachers. Testing of intelligence and academic achievement usually are required. Comorbidity is common. The corner-stones of treatment are support and education of parents, appropriate school placement, and pharmacology. The primary medications are psychostimulants, but antidepressants and α- adrenergic agonists are used in special circumstances. Other treatments such as behavior modification, school consultation, family therapy, and group therapy address remaining symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85S-121S
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number10 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Dextroamphetamine
  • Guidelines
  • Methylphenidate
  • Practice parameters
  • Psychopharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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