Practice patterns in the treatment of female urinary incontinence: A postal and internet survey

Hyung L. Kim, Glenn S. Gerber, Rajesh V. Patel, Courtney M P Hollowell, Gregory T. Bales*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To survey American urologists to assess practice patterns in treating female incontinence. Advances in the treatment of female incontinence have changed the way urologists practice. Methods. Postal and e-mail surveys were sent to 2502 members of the American Urological Association. Results. From the postal group (n = 1000), 419 (42%) responses were obtained; from the e-mail group (n = 1502), 160 (11%) responses were obtained. For types I, II, and III stress urinary incontinence (SUI), 239 (44%) of 546, 388 (68%) of 570, and 512 (94%) of 547 urologists, respectively, recommended a sling procedure. For type I SUI, 75 (53%) of the 143 respondents in practice for less than 10 years recommended a sling procedure. The sling was recommended by 62 (35%) of the 176 respondents in practice for longer than 20 years (P <0.001). Most urologists (75%, 358 of 480) referred patients with significant vaginal prolapse to a gynecologist; however, urologists in full-time academic practice were more likely to offer surgical treatment (56%, 29 of 52). Most urologists recommended medical treatment for urge incontinence (94%, 461 of 491), and the medications most commonly selected were tolterodine (41%, 202 of 491), oxybutynin (26%, 129 of 491), and extended-release oxybutynin (25%, 125 of 491). Conclusions. Overall, a sling procedure was the most commonly recommended surgical procedure for all types of SUI. Most urologists referred patients with significant vaginal prolapse to a gynecologist. For type I SUI, older urologists were more likely than younger urologists to perform needle bladder neck suspension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-48
Number of pages4
JournalUrology
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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