Pragmatic Language in autism and fragile X syndrome: Genetic and clinical applications

Molly Losh, Gary E. Martin, Jessica Klusek, Abigail L. Hogan-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evidence suggests a strong genetic basis to autism. Our research program focuses on identifying genetically meaningful phenotypes in autism, through family-genetic and cross-population methods, with a particular focus on language and social phenotypes that have been shown to aggregate in families of individuals with autism. In this article, we discuss recent findings from family study research implicating particular language and personality features as markers for genetic liability to autism and fragile X syndrome and FMR1-related variation in relatives. We conclude with consideration of the clinical implications of such findings.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPerspectives on Language Learning and Education
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pragmatic Language in autism and fragile X syndrome: Genetic and clinical applications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this