Precursors to malignant melanomas. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference statement, Oct. 24-26, 1983

R. K. Freinkel, G. W. Cage, W. A. Caro

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59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Medical scientists have become aware of a possible association between certain preexisting pigmented skin lesions and cutaneous melanoma. This interest has developed from identification of two suspected precursors to cutaneous melanoma: (1) acquired abnormal moles known as dysplastic nevi, present both in the general population and in certain melanoma-prone families, and (2) certain congenital nevi. Identification and appropriate management of such precursors could significantly reduce the incidence of, and mortality from, melanoma. In an effort to resolve some of the questions surrounding these issues, the National Institutes of Health convened a Consensus Development Conference on Precursors to Malignant Melanoma. A consensus panel, including representatives of dermatology, pathology, oncology, family medicine, immunology, epidemiology, and the general public, considered the scientific evidence and agreed on answers to the following key questions: 1. Can dysplastic nevi and congenital nevi be defined clinically and histologically? 2. Are these nevi precursors to melanoma? What are the prevalence, natural history, and determinants of these precursors? 3. What is appropriate management of patients with dysplastic nevi and congenital nevi regarding: diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, familial screening, and education? 4. What directions should be taken for future research on precursor lesions to melanoma?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-688
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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