Predicting expected absolute chemotherapy treatment benefit in women with early-stage breast cancer using endopredict, an integrated 12-gene clinicomolecular assay

Hatem Soliman, Darl D. Flake, Anthony Magliocco, Mark Robson, Lee Schwartzberg, Priyanka Sharma, Krystal Brown, Saskia Wehnelt, Ralf Kronenwett, Alexander Gutin, Johnathan Lancaster, Jack Cuzick, William Gradishar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE Previous studies have shown EndoPredict (EPclin), a test that integrates 12-gene expression data with nodal status and tumor size, to be predictive for risk of distant recurrence in women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative early-stage breast cancer. Here, we modeled expected absolute chemotherapy benefit on the basis of EPclin test results. METHODS The effect of chemotherapy was modeled using previously validated 10-year risk of distant recurrence as a function of EPclin score for patients treated without chemotherapy. Average relative chemotherapy benefit to reduce breast cancer distant recurrence was evaluated using a published meta-analysis from the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group. Absolute chemotherapy benefit differences were estimated across a range of interaction strengths between relative chemotherapy benefit and EPclin score. The average absolute benefit was calculated for patients with high and low EPclin scores using the distribution of scores in 2,185 samples tested by Myriad Genetics. RESULTS The average expected absolute benefit of chemotherapy treatment for patients with a low EPclin score was 1.8% in the absence of interaction and 1.5% for maximal interaction. Conversely, the expected average absolute chemotherapy benefit for patients with a high EPclin score was 5.3% and 7.3% for no interaction and maximal interaction, respectively. CONCLUSION For women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative early-stage breast cancer, a high EPclin score identified which patients would benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of absolute reduction of distant recurrence, regardless of the amount of interaction between EPclin and relative chemotherapy benefit. A high degree of prognostic discrimination for distant recurrence is more important for identifying patients likely to benefit most from chemotherapy than an interaction between EPclin and treatment-relative benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJCO Precision Oncology
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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