Prediction of scuffing failure based on competitive kinetics of oxide formation and removal: Application to lubricated sliding of AISI 52100 steel on steel

Eric C. Cutiongco, Yip-Wah Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

A method for predicting scuffing failure based on the competitive kinetics of oxide formation and removal has been developed and applied to the sliding of AISI 52100 steel on steel with poly-α- olefin as the lubricant. Oxide formation rates were determined using static oxidation tests on coupons of 52100 steel covered with poly-α-olefin at temperatures of 140°C to 250°C. Oxide removal rates were determined at different combinations of initial average nominal contact pressures (950 MPa to 1578 MPa) and sliding velocities (0.4 m/s to 1.8 m/s) using a ball-on-disk vacuum tribotester. The nominal asperity flash temperatures generated during the wear tests were calculated and the temperatures corresponding to the intersection of the Arrhenius plots of oxide formation and removal rates were determined and taken as the critical failure temperatures. The pressure-velocity failure transition diagram was constructed by plotting the critical failure temperatures along isotherms of average nominal asperity flash temperatures calculated at different combinations of contact stress and sliding speed. The predicted failure transition curve agreed well with experimental scuffing data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalTribology Transactions
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Keywords

  • Asperity Flash Temperatures
  • Scuffing
  • Steel
  • Synthetic Basestocks
  • Thermal Effects
  • Wear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

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