Predictive Validity of a Computerized Battery for Identifying Neurocognitive Impairments Among Children Living with HIV in Botswana

Amelia E. Van Pelt*, Tyler M. Moore, J. Cobb Scott, Onkemetse Phoi, Lingani Mbakile-Mahlanza, Knashawn H. Morales, Ruben C. Gur, Shathani Rampa, Mogomotsi Matshaba, Elizabeth D. Lowenthal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children living with HIV (HIV+) experience increased risk of neurocognitive deficits, but standardized cognitive testing is limited in low-resource, high-prevalence settings. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PennCNB) was adapted for use in Botswana. This study evaluated the criterion validity of a locally adapted version of the PennCNB among a cohort of HIV+ individuals aged 10–17 years in Botswana. Participants completed the PennCNB and a comprehensive professional consensus assessment consisting of pencil-and-paper psychological assessments, clinical interview, and review of academic performance. Seventy-two participants were classified as cases (i.e., with cognitive impairment; N = 48) or controls (i.e., without cognitive impairment; N = 24). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and the area under receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated. Discrimination was acceptable, and prediction improved as the threshold for PennCNB impairment was less conservative. This research contributes to the validation of the PennCNB for use among children affected by HIV in Botswana.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2758-2767
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Botswana
  • Criterion validity
  • Neurocognitive assessment
  • Setswana translation
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

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