Predictors of correspondence between self-reported substance use and urinalysis screening among a racially diverse cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is unknown if estimates of illicit drug use among young men who have sex with men and transgender women (YMSM/TW) may be biased due to historical distrust of research or reliable due to more accepting norms for use. Research is needed to examine the validity of drug use self-reports among YMSM/TW. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal study of YMSM/TW aged 16–29 living in Chicago (analytic N = 1029). Baseline urinalysis screens for marijuana, ecstasy, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, benzodiazepine, and opiate metabolites were compared to self-reported use within different recall periods using measures of concordance. Generalized estimating equations logistic regressions were conducted on three waves of data to identify predictors of disclosing past-6-month use of marijuana and non-marijuana drugs. Past-6-month self-reported use of all non-marijuana substances was <15%. There was excellent agreement between self-reported and drug-tested marijuana use. For other substances, sensitivities within the urinalysis detection window were <0.5 but increased with longer recall periods. Black participants had lower odds of disclosing non-marijuana drug use. Gender minority participants had lower odds of disclosing marijuana use. Participants with a history of arrest had higher odds of disclosing both marijuana and non-marijuana drug use. Wave and year of first research participation were non-significant, suggesting no systematic bias or increasing honesty associated with longer research participation. Programs that rely on self-identification of non-marijuana illicit substance use may be missing a substantial portion of drug-using YMSM/TW. Future epidemiological studies should work to reduce social desirability biases and include biomarker-based drug screenings to increase validity.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages6-14
Number of pages9
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Urinalysis
Cannabis
Screening
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Research
Opiate Alkaloids
Social Desirability
Preclinical Drug Evaluations
Methamphetamine
Street Drugs
Amphetamine
Benzodiazepines
Cocaine
Self Report
Biomarkers
Longitudinal Studies
Metabolites
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Drug testing
  • Illicit drugs
  • Measurement error
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Predictors of correspondence between self-reported substance use and urinalysis screening among a racially diverse cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women",
abstract = "It is unknown if estimates of illicit drug use among young men who have sex with men and transgender women (YMSM/TW) may be biased due to historical distrust of research or reliable due to more accepting norms for use. Research is needed to examine the validity of drug use self-reports among YMSM/TW. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal study of YMSM/TW aged 16–29 living in Chicago (analytic N = 1029). Baseline urinalysis screens for marijuana, ecstasy, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, benzodiazepine, and opiate metabolites were compared to self-reported use within different recall periods using measures of concordance. Generalized estimating equations logistic regressions were conducted on three waves of data to identify predictors of disclosing past-6-month use of marijuana and non-marijuana drugs. Past-6-month self-reported use of all non-marijuana substances was <15{\%}. There was excellent agreement between self-reported and drug-tested marijuana use. For other substances, sensitivities within the urinalysis detection window were <0.5 but increased with longer recall periods. Black participants had lower odds of disclosing non-marijuana drug use. Gender minority participants had lower odds of disclosing marijuana use. Participants with a history of arrest had higher odds of disclosing both marijuana and non-marijuana drug use. Wave and year of first research participation were non-significant, suggesting no systematic bias or increasing honesty associated with longer research participation. Programs that rely on self-identification of non-marijuana illicit substance use may be missing a substantial portion of drug-using YMSM/TW. Future epidemiological studies should work to reduce social desirability biases and include biomarker-based drug screenings to increase validity.",
keywords = "Drug testing, Illicit drugs, Measurement error, Men who have sex with men, Validity",
author = "Li, {Dennis H.} and Janulis, {Patrick Francis} and Brian Mustanski",
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N2 - It is unknown if estimates of illicit drug use among young men who have sex with men and transgender women (YMSM/TW) may be biased due to historical distrust of research or reliable due to more accepting norms for use. Research is needed to examine the validity of drug use self-reports among YMSM/TW. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal study of YMSM/TW aged 16–29 living in Chicago (analytic N = 1029). Baseline urinalysis screens for marijuana, ecstasy, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, benzodiazepine, and opiate metabolites were compared to self-reported use within different recall periods using measures of concordance. Generalized estimating equations logistic regressions were conducted on three waves of data to identify predictors of disclosing past-6-month use of marijuana and non-marijuana drugs. Past-6-month self-reported use of all non-marijuana substances was <15%. There was excellent agreement between self-reported and drug-tested marijuana use. For other substances, sensitivities within the urinalysis detection window were <0.5 but increased with longer recall periods. Black participants had lower odds of disclosing non-marijuana drug use. Gender minority participants had lower odds of disclosing marijuana use. Participants with a history of arrest had higher odds of disclosing both marijuana and non-marijuana drug use. Wave and year of first research participation were non-significant, suggesting no systematic bias or increasing honesty associated with longer research participation. Programs that rely on self-identification of non-marijuana illicit substance use may be missing a substantial portion of drug-using YMSM/TW. Future epidemiological studies should work to reduce social desirability biases and include biomarker-based drug screenings to increase validity.

AB - It is unknown if estimates of illicit drug use among young men who have sex with men and transgender women (YMSM/TW) may be biased due to historical distrust of research or reliable due to more accepting norms for use. Research is needed to examine the validity of drug use self-reports among YMSM/TW. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal study of YMSM/TW aged 16–29 living in Chicago (analytic N = 1029). Baseline urinalysis screens for marijuana, ecstasy, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, benzodiazepine, and opiate metabolites were compared to self-reported use within different recall periods using measures of concordance. Generalized estimating equations logistic regressions were conducted on three waves of data to identify predictors of disclosing past-6-month use of marijuana and non-marijuana drugs. Past-6-month self-reported use of all non-marijuana substances was <15%. There was excellent agreement between self-reported and drug-tested marijuana use. For other substances, sensitivities within the urinalysis detection window were <0.5 but increased with longer recall periods. Black participants had lower odds of disclosing non-marijuana drug use. Gender minority participants had lower odds of disclosing marijuana use. Participants with a history of arrest had higher odds of disclosing both marijuana and non-marijuana drug use. Wave and year of first research participation were non-significant, suggesting no systematic bias or increasing honesty associated with longer research participation. Programs that rely on self-identification of non-marijuana illicit substance use may be missing a substantial portion of drug-using YMSM/TW. Future epidemiological studies should work to reduce social desirability biases and include biomarker-based drug screenings to increase validity.

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