Predictors of correspondence between self-reported substance use and urinalysis screening among a racially diverse cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women

Dennis H. Li, Patrick Janulis, Brian Mustanski*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is unknown if estimates of illicit drug use among young men who have sex with men and transgender women (YMSM/TW) may be biased due to historical distrust of research or reliable due to more accepting norms for use. Research is needed to examine the validity of drug use self-reports among YMSM/TW. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal study of YMSM/TW aged 16–29 living in Chicago (analytic N = 1029). Baseline urinalysis screens for marijuana, ecstasy, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, benzodiazepine, and opiate metabolites were compared to self-reported use within different recall periods using measures of concordance. Generalized estimating equations logistic regressions were conducted on three waves of data to identify predictors of disclosing past-6-month use of marijuana and non-marijuana drugs. Past-6-month self-reported use of all non-marijuana substances was <15%. There was excellent agreement between self-reported and drug-tested marijuana use. For other substances, sensitivities within the urinalysis detection window were <0.5 but increased with longer recall periods. Black participants had lower odds of disclosing non-marijuana drug use. Gender minority participants had lower odds of disclosing marijuana use. Participants with a history of arrest had higher odds of disclosing both marijuana and non-marijuana drug use. Wave and year of first research participation were non-significant, suggesting no systematic bias or increasing honesty associated with longer research participation. Programs that rely on self-identification of non-marijuana illicit substance use may be missing a substantial portion of drug-using YMSM/TW. Future epidemiological studies should work to reduce social desirability biases and include biomarker-based drug screenings to increase validity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-14
Number of pages9
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Drug testing
  • Illicit drugs
  • Measurement error
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Predictors of correspondence between self-reported substance use and urinalysis screening among a racially diverse cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this