Predictors of perceived control among African American women in Detroit: Exploring empowerment as a multilevel construct

Adam B. Becker*, Barbara A. Israel, Amy J. Schulz, Edith A. Parker, Laura Klem

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Efforts to enhance empowerment toward the aim of improved health require an understanding of factors that contribute to perceived control at multiple levels, as a dimension of empowerment. In this article, the authors examine hypothesized predictors of perceived control at multiple levels among urban, African American women. Variables that predict perceived control include greater participation in change-related action; level of activity within respondents' most important organizations; and attempts made by those organizations to influence public officials, businesses, and other groups. Results suggest that (1) perceived control is a context-specific, multilevel construct; (2) citizen participation is an important factor in control and influence at multiple levels; and (3) organizations that are involved within neighborhoods and in the broader community can help to increase control and influence at multiple levels in marginalized communities. Implications for health education practice and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)699-715
Number of pages17
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Predictors of perceived control among African American women in Detroit: Exploring empowerment as a multilevel construct'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this