Predictors of preterm infant feeding methods and perceived insufficient milk supply at week 12 postpartum

Pamela D. Hill*, Jean C. Aldag, Michael Zinaman, Robert T. Chatterton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

As part of a large, nonexperimental, prospective, longitudinal study, 94 pump-dependent mothers of a nonnursing preterm infant were queried via telephone at weeks 8 to 12 post-partum about their infant feeding method. At week 12, 44.6% provided own mother's milk, 26.6% provided own mother's milk + artificial milk, and 28.7% provided artificial milk only. Logistic regression analyses identified the following predictors for risk of artificial milk at week 12 postpartum: multiple birth, week 6 inadequate milk supply, maternal age younger than 29 years, and intended length of lactation less than 34 weeks. Predictors for risk of maternal perceived insufficient milk supply for weeks 8 to 12 postpartum included week 6 inadequate milk supply, unemployment, and infant hospital discharge after postpartum day 42. Further research is needed to assist pump-dependent mothers of preterm infants with sustaining their milk supply.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Keywords

  • Insufficient milk
  • Lactation
  • Nutrition
  • Preterm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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