Predictors of psychological outcomes in a longitudinal study of Latina breast cancer survivors

Betina Yanez*, Melinda Maggard Gibbons, Patricia I. Moreno, Alexandra Jorge, Annette L. Stanton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to investigate the unique contributions of socio-ecological, cultural and cancer treatment-related factors in predicting depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress among Latinas. Design: Participants were 140 English or Spanish-speaking Latinas (M age = 50.6) with non-metastatic breast cancer who were assessed within two years of diagnosis (Time 1) and three months later (Time 2). Main Measures: Hierarchical regression analyses identified predictors of depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress at Time 1 and 2. Results: Most women scored above the clinical cut-offs for depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress. After adjusting for socio-ecological factors, greater Latino enculturation, measured by Latino ethnic identity, was significantly associated with greater cancer-specific distress at Time 1 (β = .20, p < .05). A significant interaction (p < .01) revealed that among women high on Latino identity, lower English language use was associated with more cancer-specific distress than higher English language use. After adjusting for socio-ecological factors, greater satisfaction with surgical treatment predicted improved depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress across time (β s range from −.31 to −.18, p s < .01). Conclusions: Findings elucidate the complex relationship between culture and psychological outcomes in the breast cancer context and suggest that treatment satisfaction might be an important intervention target for Latinas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1359-1374
Number of pages16
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • Latina
  • acculturation
  • breast cancer
  • distress
  • psychosocial
  • treatment satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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