Preeclampsia and sleep-disordered breathing: A case-control study

Francesca L. Facco*, Justin Lappen, Courtney Lim, Phyllis C. Zee, William A. Grobman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is more prevalent among women with preeclampsia than among normotensive controls. Study design: Preeclamptic patients admitted to the hospital for observation and normotensive, gestational age matched controls hospitalized for obstetrical indications other than preeclampsia were recruited for an overnight sleep evaluation. Watch-PAT100, a validated wrist-mounted, ambulatory device designed to diagnose SDB, was used to complete all sleep studies. Results: Twenty preeclamptic patients and 20 controls were recruited. Preeclamptic subjects had a higher mean BMI (32.6 ± 9.5 vs. 24.5 ± 3.5, P = 0.001). Preeclamptic subjects had higher mean respiratory disturbance (RDI, mean difference 4.9 events/hour of sleep), apnea hypopnea (AHI, mean difference 5.7 events/hour of sleep) and oxygen desaturation (ODI, mean difference 4.5 events/hour of sleep) indices, however these differences did not reach statistical significance. Preeclamptic subjects were more likely to have more severe forms of SDB compared to controls (ODI ≥ 5, 20% vs. 0%, p =.047). Conclusion: Compared to normotensive controls, preeclamptic subjects experience more SDB events and a greater degree of nocturnal hypoxemia. Further research is needed to determine if SDB, independent of BMI, is a significant contributing factor to the risk of developing preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalPregnancy Hypertension
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Preeclampsia
  • Pregnancy
  • Sleep-disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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