Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy

David M. Haas, Derek J. Marsh, Danny T. Dang, Corette B. Parker, Deborah A. Wing, Hyagriv N. Simhan, William A Grobman, Brian M. Mercer, Robert M. Silver, Matthew K. Hoffman, Samuel Parry, Jay D. Iams, Steve N. Caritis, Ronald J. Wapner, M. Sean Esplin, Michal A. Elovitz, Alan M Peaceman, Judith Chung, George R. Saade, Uma M. Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize prescription and other medication use in a geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of women in their first pregnancy. METHODS: In a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of nulliparous women followed through pregnancy from the first trimester, medication use was chronicled longitudinally throughout pregnancy. Structured questions and aids were used to capture all medications taken as well as reasons they were taken. Total counts of all medications taken including number in each category and class were captured. Additionally, reasons the medications were taken were recorded. Trends in medications taken across pregnancy and in the first trimester were determined. RESULTS: Of the 9,546 study participants, 9,272 (97.1%) women took at least one medication during pregnancy with 9,139 (95.7%) taking a medication in the first trimester. Polypharmacy, defined as taking at least five medications, occurred in 2,915 (30.5%) women. Excluding vitamins, supplements, and vaccines, 73.4% of women took a medication during pregnancy with 55.1% taking one in the first trimester. The categories of drugs taken in pregnancy and in the first trimester include the following: gastrointestinal or antiemetic agents (34.3%, 19.5%), antibiotics (25.5%, 12.6%), and analgesics (23.7%, 15.6%, which includes 3.6%; 1.4% taking an opioid pain medication). CONCLUSION: In this geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of nulliparous pregnant women, medication use was nearly universal and polypharmacy was common. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01322529.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)789-798
Number of pages10
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume131
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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First Pregnancy Trimester
Prescriptions
Pregnancy
Polypharmacy
Gastrointestinal Agents
Antiemetics
Vitamins
Opioid Analgesics
Longitudinal Studies
Analgesics
Pregnant Women
Cohort Studies
Vaccines
Clinical Trials
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pain
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Haas, D. M., Marsh, D. J., Dang, D. T., Parker, C. B., Wing, D. A., Simhan, H. N., ... Reddy, U. M. (2018). Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy. Obstetrics and gynecology, 131(5), 789-798. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002579
Haas, David M. ; Marsh, Derek J. ; Dang, Danny T. ; Parker, Corette B. ; Wing, Deborah A. ; Simhan, Hyagriv N. ; Grobman, William A ; Mercer, Brian M. ; Silver, Robert M. ; Hoffman, Matthew K. ; Parry, Samuel ; Iams, Jay D. ; Caritis, Steve N. ; Wapner, Ronald J. ; Esplin, M. Sean ; Elovitz, Michal A. ; Peaceman, Alan M ; Chung, Judith ; Saade, George R. ; Reddy, Uma M. / Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy. In: Obstetrics and gynecology. 2018 ; Vol. 131, No. 5. pp. 789-798.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To characterize prescription and other medication use in a geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of women in their first pregnancy. METHODS: In a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of nulliparous women followed through pregnancy from the first trimester, medication use was chronicled longitudinally throughout pregnancy. Structured questions and aids were used to capture all medications taken as well as reasons they were taken. Total counts of all medications taken including number in each category and class were captured. Additionally, reasons the medications were taken were recorded. Trends in medications taken across pregnancy and in the first trimester were determined. RESULTS: Of the 9,546 study participants, 9,272 (97.1{\%}) women took at least one medication during pregnancy with 9,139 (95.7{\%}) taking a medication in the first trimester. Polypharmacy, defined as taking at least five medications, occurred in 2,915 (30.5{\%}) women. Excluding vitamins, supplements, and vaccines, 73.4{\%} of women took a medication during pregnancy with 55.1{\%} taking one in the first trimester. The categories of drugs taken in pregnancy and in the first trimester include the following: gastrointestinal or antiemetic agents (34.3{\%}, 19.5{\%}), antibiotics (25.5{\%}, 12.6{\%}), and analgesics (23.7{\%}, 15.6{\%}, which includes 3.6{\%}; 1.4{\%} taking an opioid pain medication). CONCLUSION: In this geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of nulliparous pregnant women, medication use was nearly universal and polypharmacy was common. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01322529.",
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Haas, DM, Marsh, DJ, Dang, DT, Parker, CB, Wing, DA, Simhan, HN, Grobman, WA, Mercer, BM, Silver, RM, Hoffman, MK, Parry, S, Iams, JD, Caritis, SN, Wapner, RJ, Esplin, MS, Elovitz, MA, Peaceman, AM, Chung, J, Saade, GR & Reddy, UM 2018, 'Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy', Obstetrics and gynecology, vol. 131, no. 5, pp. 789-798. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002579

Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy. / Haas, David M.; Marsh, Derek J.; Dang, Danny T.; Parker, Corette B.; Wing, Deborah A.; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Grobman, William A; Mercer, Brian M.; Silver, Robert M.; Hoffman, Matthew K.; Parry, Samuel; Iams, Jay D.; Caritis, Steve N.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Esplin, M. Sean; Elovitz, Michal A.; Peaceman, Alan M; Chung, Judith; Saade, George R.; Reddy, Uma M.

In: Obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 131, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 789-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy

AU - Haas, David M.

AU - Marsh, Derek J.

AU - Dang, Danny T.

AU - Parker, Corette B.

AU - Wing, Deborah A.

AU - Simhan, Hyagriv N.

AU - Grobman, William A

AU - Mercer, Brian M.

AU - Silver, Robert M.

AU - Hoffman, Matthew K.

AU - Parry, Samuel

AU - Iams, Jay D.

AU - Caritis, Steve N.

AU - Wapner, Ronald J.

AU - Esplin, M. Sean

AU - Elovitz, Michal A.

AU - Peaceman, Alan M

AU - Chung, Judith

AU - Saade, George R.

AU - Reddy, Uma M.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To characterize prescription and other medication use in a geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of women in their first pregnancy. METHODS: In a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of nulliparous women followed through pregnancy from the first trimester, medication use was chronicled longitudinally throughout pregnancy. Structured questions and aids were used to capture all medications taken as well as reasons they were taken. Total counts of all medications taken including number in each category and class were captured. Additionally, reasons the medications were taken were recorded. Trends in medications taken across pregnancy and in the first trimester were determined. RESULTS: Of the 9,546 study participants, 9,272 (97.1%) women took at least one medication during pregnancy with 9,139 (95.7%) taking a medication in the first trimester. Polypharmacy, defined as taking at least five medications, occurred in 2,915 (30.5%) women. Excluding vitamins, supplements, and vaccines, 73.4% of women took a medication during pregnancy with 55.1% taking one in the first trimester. The categories of drugs taken in pregnancy and in the first trimester include the following: gastrointestinal or antiemetic agents (34.3%, 19.5%), antibiotics (25.5%, 12.6%), and analgesics (23.7%, 15.6%, which includes 3.6%; 1.4% taking an opioid pain medication). CONCLUSION: In this geographically and ethnically diverse cohort of nulliparous pregnant women, medication use was nearly universal and polypharmacy was common. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01322529.

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Haas DM, Marsh DJ, Dang DT, Parker CB, Wing DA, Simhan HN et al. Prescription and Other Medication Use in Pregnancy. Obstetrics and gynecology. 2018 May 1;131(5):789-798. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002579