Presentation and outcome of patients with punctate inner choroidopathy at a tertiary referral center

Kevin H. Patel, Andrea D. Birnbaum, Howard H. Tessler, Debra A. Goldstein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the clinical course of patients with punctate inner choroidopathy seen at the University of Illinois, with emphasis on development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods: Patients with a diagnosis of punctate inner choroidopathy were identified retrospectively. The diagnosis was made clinically based on findings of multiple, small "punched-out" lesions in the posterior pole without intraocular inflammation. Medical records were evaluated for evidence of CNV. Results: Twelve patients with a diagnosis of punctate inner choroidopathy were identified. Average age at presentation was 32 years (range, 24-52 years). Eleven were women, and 11 were white. Eleven patients had available refractive data: 10 were myopic. Eight had CNV at initial presentation, and 1 later developed CNV. Eight had follow-up averaging 4 years (range, 1.4-9.6 years). Of these, five had CNV at initial presentation, and five developed new CNV. Four had multiple CNV membranes. All 6 patients with follow-up of ≥3 years had visual acuity at 3 years postpresentation of >20/40 in at least 1 eye. Four had visual acuity >20/40 bilaterally. Conclusion: Of punctate inner choroidopathy patients in this series, 75% had CNV, and more than 30% developed multiple neovascular membranes. With treatment, all patients with follow-up of ≥3 years had >20/40 vision in at least 1 eye.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1387-1391
Number of pages5
JournalRetina
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Keywords

  • CNV
  • PIC
  • choroidal neovascularization
  • punctate inner choroidopathy
  • recurrence
  • uveitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Presentation and outcome of patients with punctate inner choroidopathy at a tertiary referral center'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this